17 Other Ways to Say “As You Can See”

Other Ways to Say As You Can See

The phrase “as you can see” is a staple of presentations, essays, and everyday conversation, serving as a bridge between an observation and its obvious conclusion.

However, relying on this phrase alone can make your communication sound repetitive and uninspired. Varying your vocabulary not only improves your expression but also grabs your audience’s attention. In this article, we’ll go through 17 alternative expressions of “as you can see,” each offering a new perspective and adding nuance to your statements.

Other Ways to Say “As You Can See”

Highlighting Observations

When you want to draw attention to something evident or observable, here are some alternatives to “as you can see”:

1. Clearly

Clearly, the data shows a rising trend in sales.”

Meaning: The word “clearly” emphasizes the unmistakable nature of the observation, suggesting that the evidence or point being made is so evident that it’s almost indisputable.

Usage: Suitable for both formal presentations and casual conversations when you want to stress the clarity of an observation.

2. Evidently

Evidently, the new marketing strategy is working.”

Meaning: “Evidently” implies that the conclusion or observation is drawn directly from the evidence at hand, making the statement seem factual and based on clear indicators.

Usage: Ideal for situations where you’re presenting results or outcomes based on data or facts.

3. Notice that

Notice that the colors of the painting are predominantly blue and green.”

Meaning: This phrase acts as an invitation, urging the listener or reader to pay specific attention to a detail that might be of significance or interest.

Usage: Great for descriptive scenarios, such as art critiques or product demonstrations.

4. From this

From this, we can infer that the company’s investments are paying off.”

Meaning: This phrase suggests a deeper level of analysis, indicating that the conclusion is not just based on the obvious but also on underlying data or patterns.

Usage: Suitable for analytical discussions where you’re interpreting data or trends.

man showing something on his laptop

Emphasizing Realizations

Sometimes, you want to stress a realization or an insight. In such cases, consider these alternatives:

5. It’s apparent that

It’s apparent that the team has put a lot of effort into this project.”

Meaning: This phrase underscores the visibility or recognizability of a fact or situation, indicating that the observation is almost universally recognizable to anyone paying attention.

Usage: Use this when acknowledging someone’s efforts or when something stands out clearly.

6. Upon closer examination

Upon closer examination, you’ll find that the numbers don’t add up.”

Meaning: This phrase suggests a need for a more in-depth look, implying that a cursory glance might not reveal the entire truth or that there’s more beneath the surface.

Usage: Ideal for situations where a superficial glance might not reveal the whole story.

7. It’s evident from

It’s evident from the feedback that customers love the new design.”

Meaning: This phrase emphasizes that the source of the information (in this case, the feedback) provides clear and indisputable proof of the claim being made.

Usage: Useful when citing a specific source of evidence or feedback.

Drawing Attention

8. Observe that

Observe that the pattern is consistent throughout the data.”

Meaning: This phrase acts as a directive, directing the audience’s attention to a particular detail or pattern that may be relevant.

Usage: Suitable for presentations or discussions where you want to guide the audience’s attention to a particular point.

9. If you look closely

If you look closely, there’s a subtle difference between the two images.”

Meaning: This phrase emphasizes the need for detailed investigation, suggesting that the observation requires more than a casual glance to be recognized.

Usage: Ideal for situations where details are crucial, such as art critiques or data analysis.

10. As is evident

As is evident, the results are far from what we expected.”

Meaning: This phrase emphasizes the transparency of the situation, suggesting that the results or outcomes are so clear as to be almost self-evident.

Usage: Useful when discussing outcomes or results that are surprising or unexpected.

man showing reports on a computer

Highlighting Conclusions

11. From the data presented

From the data presented, it’s clear that our strategy is effective.”

Meaning: This phrase emphasizes that the conclusion is drawn directly from the data provided, reinforcing the idea that the claim is based on tangible evidence.

Usage: Suitable for business meetings or academic presentations where you’re interpreting and concluding from data.

12. As illustrated

As illustrated, the new approach has multiple benefits.”

Meaning: This phrase indicates that benefits or points are demonstrated or shown effectively through examples, visuals, or explanations.

Usage: Ideal for discussions where examples or demonstrations have been provided.

13. As demonstrated

As demonstrated, the technique is more efficient than previous methods.”

Meaning: This emphasizes that there has been a practical demonstration or proof establishing the superiority or effectiveness of the technique in question.

Usage: Useful in scientific, technical, or academic contexts where methods and techniques are compared.

14. General Observations

14. You’ll notice

You’ll notice that the trend has been consistent for the past five years.”

Meaning: This phrase acts as a gentle prompt, suggesting that the observation is obvious and that the listener or reader will easily recognize the point being made upon examination.

Usage: Suitable for presentations or discussions where you’re pointing out patterns or trends.

15. Taking a look at this

Taking a look at this, we can see the discrepancies.”

Meaning: This phrase invites a closer examination of a specific point or detail.

Usage: Ideal for situations where you’re highlighting errors, differences, or inconsistencies.

16. From what’s shown

From what’s shown, we can deduce the project’s success.”

Meaning: This phrase suggests drawing a logical conclusion from the displayed information.

Usage: Suitable for analytical discussions or when presenting findings.

17. As depicted

As depicted, the graph shows a steady increase in sales.”

Meaning: This phrase emphasizes that a visual representation, like a graph or chart, is providing the information.

Usage: Ideal for presentations involving visual aids or data visualization.

17 Other Ways to Say As You Can See Infographic

When to use different “as you can see” expressions

Just as with wishing someone luck, the phrase you choose to replace “as you can see” should fit the context:

Formal settings

In professional or academic environments, opt for phrases like “clearly,” “evidently,” or “it’s apparent that.” These convey a sense of authority and clarity.

Casual settings

In more relaxed conversations, you can use phrases like “look here” or “notice that.” They’re direct and straightforward.

Descriptive scenarios

When describing art, nature, or any visual element, “upon closer examination” or “if you observe” can be more fitting.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is important to understand the roots and meaning of the phrase “as you can see.” At its core, this expression serves as a bridge connecting an observation to an obvious conclusion, guiding the listener or reader to a clear understanding. This is evidence of the speaker’s intention to make his point clear and prominent.

However, as with any frequently used phrase, it can become a crutch, resulting in monotonous repetition. By exploring and integrating the 17 alternative expressions we’ve discussed, you can bring vibrancy and depth to your communication. So the next time you’re about to say “as you see,” consider stopping and choosing a phrase that adds a fresh twist to your narrative.

For those who want to delve deeper into the intricacies of the English language and discover more expressions, the Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries is an invaluable resource worth exploring.

FAQs

  1. Is “as you can see” grammatically correct? Yes, “as you can see” is grammatically correct. It’s a commonly used phrase to draw attention to something evident or observable.
  2. When should I avoid using “as you can see”? It’s best to avoid “as you can see” when addressing visually impaired individuals or when discussing abstract concepts that aren’t visually represented. Additionally, overusing the phrase can make your communication sound repetitive.
  3. Can “as you can see” be used in formal settings? Yes, “as you can see” is appropriate for formal settings, especially during presentations or discussions where you’re referencing visual aids or data. However, it’s essential to ensure that what you’re referencing is indeed visible and clear to the audience.
  4. Can “as you can see” be used in written documents? It can be used in written documents, especially when referencing diagrams, charts, or illustrations. However, it’s crucial to ensure that the reference is clear to the reader.
  5. Is it appropriate to use “as you can see” in academic writing? While it’s not incorrect to use “as you can see” in academic writing, it’s often better to be more specific about what you’re referencing. Phrases like “as illustrated in Figure 1” or “as depicted in the chart above” can provide clearer context in academic papers.
  6. Does “as you can see” imply that the conclusion is obvious? Yes, the phrase often suggests that the observation or conclusion being drawn is evident or straightforward based on the provided information or visual aid.
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